SECRETARY OF DEFENSE scraps Obama’s restrictive Rules of Engagement

Secretary of Defense James Mattis has changed the Rules of Engagement in Afghanistan, which, under the Obama regime, severely restricted our combat troops’ ability to use deadly force in the face of the enemy, a disastrous approach that put the lives of Afghan civilians before the lives of American troops.

Daily Caller  Mattis said Tuesday at hearings before the House and Senate that the White House had given him new authority to change the rules of engagement, which he has already made use of by letting U.S. troops fire on the Taliban regardless of physical proximity, Military Times reports.

UNDER OBAMA:

UNDER TRUMP:

Daily Caller  Mattis said Tuesday at hearings before the House and Senate that the White House had given him new authority to change the rules of engagement, which he has already made use of by letting U.S. troops fire on the Taliban regardless of physical proximity, Military Times reports.

Such a change is not entirely unexpected, as President Donald Trump said in an Aug. 21 speech that he would “expand authorities” for U.S. troops in the region, though at the time he didn’t elaborate on what precisely that would look like.

“We will also expand authorities for American armed forces to target the terrorists and criminal networks that sow violence and chaos throughout Afghanistan,” Trump said during that speech.

Now, Mattis has decided to modify physical proximity rules and also let U.S. troops advise low-level units of the Afghan military.

“You see some of the results of releasing our military from, for example, a proximity requirement — how close was the enemy to the Afghan or the U.S.-advised special forces,” Mattis said Tuesday morning before the Senate Committee on Armed Services.

“That is no longer the case, for example,” Mattis added. “So these kind of restrictions that did not allow us to employ the airpower fully have been removed, yes.”

WASHINGTON TIMES An informal list of the restrictive rules under Barack Hussein Obama from interviews with U.S. forces. Among them:

• No night or surprise searches.
• Villagers have to be warned prior to searches.
• ANA or ANP must accompany U.S. units on searches.
• U.S. soldiers may not fire at the enemy unless the enemy is preparing to fire first.
• U.S. forces cannot engage the enemy if civilians are present.
• Only women can search women.
• Troops can fire at an insurgent if they catch him placing an IED but not if insurgents are walking away from an area where explosives have been laid.

U.S. forces in Afghanistan have been prohibited from striking the Taliban since 2014, unless Taliban fighters directly threaten U.S. or allied forces, or in the event that the Afghan government is about to lose a major city, according to a 2016 Wall Street Journal piece.

This created a complicated legal and political situation, which frustrated troops on the ground, but the Trump administration’s new Afghanistan strategy has prompted Mattis to give a much wider latitude to troops to go after the Taliban.

In 2014,  Col. Allen B. West (Ret), said, “As a former combat commander,  I can tell you that on today’s battlefields, a new fear haunts our troops: the fear of persecution by their own government. That fear leads to internal hesitation. And that leads to death.”

“The Obama government’s incessant tightening of already restrictive ROE (Rules of Engagement), compounded by the failed COIN (Counterinsurgency) strategy—also known as “winning hearts and minds”—has made an otherwise primitive enemy formidable.”

After Obama’s changes to the rules of engagement in 2009, American deaths in Afghanistan skyrocketed. Billy and Karen Vaughn, whose son was a Navy SEAL killed in 2011 in Afghanistan talks about how the new rules of engagement were endangering our troops.

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Courtesy BareNakedIslam.com

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